Breed Info

Shiba Inu have a “fox like” appearance that is captivating.  They are unusually hardy and robust little dogs that do not require the pampering and grooming that so many breeds require. They are a very friendly dog, lively while also being very attentive to their owners feelings.  They can be an excellent guard dogs, yet are not a yappy breed.  They make an excellent family pets and wonderful playmate for children.  The loyalty of the breed to their masters and family is a much repeated statement that we have heard from the people who have owned them.

 

PERSONALITY

The well-bred Shiba Inu is good-natured, alert, and bold. He is strong-willed and confident, and often has his own ideas about things. He is loyal and affectionate with his family, though tends to be suspicious of strangers.

The Shiba Inu doesn’t share well. He tends to guard, sometimes aggressively, his food, toys, or territory. And he doesn’t always get along with other dogs, especially if he’s intact. He won’t hesitate to chase small animals that he considers prey.

 

HEALTH

Shiba Inus are generally healthy, but like all breeds, they’re prone to certain health conditions. Not all Shiba Inus will get any or all of these diseases, but it’s important to be aware of them if you’re considering this breed.

 

If you’re buying a puppy, find a good breeder who will show you health clearances for both your puppy’s parents. Health clearances prove that a dog has been tested for and cleared of a particular condition.

 

In Shiba Inu, you should expect to see health clearances from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) for hip dysplasia (with a score of fair or better), elbow dysplasia, hypothyroidism, and von Willebrand’s disease; from Auburn University for thrombopathia; and from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation (CERF) certifying that eyes are normal. You can confirm health clearances by checking the OFA web site (offa.org).

 

CARE

The Shiba Inu is best suited to a home with a fenced yard. He is an active breed who likes to play, take walks, or jog along with you. Giving him room to roam will help him get his ya-yas out.

 

Socialization is important with this breed. Like any dog, he can become timid or quarrelsome if he isn’t properly socialized — exposed to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when he’s young. Early socialization helps ensure that your Shiba Inu puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog because he is suspicious of strangers.

 

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Recommended daily amount: 1/2 to 1.5 cups of high-quality dry food a day, divided into two meals.

 

Note: How much your adult dog eats depends on his size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level. Dogs are individuals, just like people, and they don’t all need the same amount of food. It almost goes without saying that a highly active dog will need more than a couch potato dog. The quality of dog food you buy also makes a difference — the better the dog food, the further it will go toward nourishing your dog and the less of it you’ll need to shake into your dog’s bowl.

 

Keep your Shiba Inu in good shape by measuring his food and feeding him twice a day rather than leaving food out all the time. If you’re unsure whether he’s overweight, give him the eye test and the hands-on test.

 

First, look down at him. You should be able to see a waist. Then place your hands on his back, thumbs along the spine, with the fingers spread downward. You should be able to feel but not see his ribs without having to press hard. If you can’t, he needs less food and more exercise.

 

CHILDREN AND OTHER PETS

The Shiba Inu is a good family dog, as long as he is raised properly and receives training and proper socialization when he’s young. He gets along with children who treat him kindly and respectfully.

 

As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he’s eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog’s food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.

 

Early training and socialization go a long way in helping the Shiba Inu get along with other dogs and animals, but it’s not a guarantee. He can be aggressive toward other dogs and he will chase animals he perceives as prey. Training and keeping him on leash are the best ways to manage the Shiba Inu with other dogs and animals.